The least I can do

It’s another dry stretch for candidates, and simultaneously a chilly, wet stretch down here on the farm. I especially want to hear from Cory, Jay and Stacy. I want to invite Kamala for a second interview. I want to invite Barack and Michelle over for dinner.

Speaking of Jay Inslee, he’s the only one who’s all about climate change, and he’s right to be. —–> From here yrmama could veer into religion, science, raptors, poison ivy, catastrophic weather events, how it is taking well over ten years to move the UI’s art campus uphill (after the the last giant flood) and to raise Dubuque Street enough that people can reliably get in and out of town. Eleven years ago I watched a woman scooping up large fish with a net in City Park, in the grass, as the water rose and rose and rose. She was filling a big bucket with writhing fish, like 10 inches long, and planned to share them with whoever wanted to help eat them. It was bewildering.

Or we can discuss yrmama’s favorite way to address the epidemic of plastic consumerism we’re all about to choke on. At the Mennonite thrift store where I volunteer sorting through other people’s huge bags of crap, we divert 10 bajillion units of solid waste A DAY from being dumped in the formerly pretty little crick nearby or sent to the steaming, reeking landfill a little farther off. The sale-able stuff is sold for cash money to support international relief projects many of which, you guessed it, are probably triggered or at least complicated by fucking climate change. 

*yrmama used to buy everything second hand because she was poor. Now that yrmama is rich she prefers to buy things second hand because it’s more fun and way more interesting. Plus it helps divert a bit of that aforementioned mountain of other people’s crap from the crick.

https://www.thegazette.com/subject/news/business/crowded-closet-in-fourth-home-in-41-years-20190330
Volunteers sort your great aunt’s apple-sauce jars of buttons and sew them onto cards. It’s the best variety of buttons you’re ever going to find.

Some donors to the shop are Marie Kondo-ing, some just will lose their minds of they don’t do something to get that mountain of outgrown soccer shoes out from behind the couch. Some middle-aged siblings who live far away come with pickup trucks full of warped tupperware, doilies, stained vintage clothes, National Geographics, footstools, peanut butter jars full of screws, and a few dozen boxes of Q-tips from when they were on sale in 1984 and someone stocked up. They look stunned because their last parent just died and they have to clean out the house and they don’t want to cry until later. I LOVE sorting that stuff. It’s the least I can do.

3 thoughts on “The least I can do

  1. yrmama, we are cut from the same cloth! Thrift was exactly the same for me — thrift was a necessity when I was poor, now it is a means to build my FU money by not spending needlessly on clothing and have the environmental benefit of not creating new clothing. Even my pants are from Patagonia’s worn wear program – I needed something with a heavy duty bottom to put up with all my bicycling and last for more than a few months.

    Your friend at FrugalWheels highly endorses this post!

    Like

    • Hi B.C. – I love knowing the money I didn’t spend on new things can go somewhere else too. Like experiences – they last forever and more stuff is just more stuff. Unless you imbue each bit of stuff with a piece of your soul like a horcrux. Then you have to scramble around in a pile of horcruxes – yuck.

      Like

      • Totally agree! I’m not sure what age it happened at but I just slowly lost my need for things. Bicycles and my camera are exceptions, but mostly for the experience they bring. I even kind of hate when people give me things, unless it’s something truly sentimental. Love all your posts, yymama! Can’t wait to read more!

        Liked by 1 person

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